tajikistan

Workers of the world, unite!

Tajikistan officially the Republic of Tajikistan, is a mountainous, landlocked country in Central Asia with an area of 143,100 km2 (55,300 sq mi) and an estimated population of 9,537,645 people. It is bordered by Afghanistan to the south, Uzbekistan to the west, Kyrgyzstan to the north and China to the east. The traditional homelands of the Tajik people include present-day Tajikistan as well as parts of Afghanistan and Uzbekistan.

Tajikistan is landlocked, and is the smallest nation in Central Asia by area. It lies mostly between latitudes 36° and 41° N, and longitudes 67° and 75° E. It is covered by mountains of the Pamir range, and most of the country is over 3,000 metres above sea level. The only major areas of lower land are in the north (part of the Fergana Valley), and in the southern Kofarnihon and Vakhsh river valleys, which form the Amu Darya. Dushanbe is located on the southern slopes above the Kofarnihon valley.

Tajikistan’s rivers, such as the Vakhsh and the Panj, have great hydropower potential, and the government has focused on attracting investment for projects for internal use and electricity exports. Tajikistan is home to the Nurek Dam, the second highest dam in the world.

Tajik cuisine is a traditional cuisine of Tajikistan, and has much in common with Russian, Afghan, Iranian and Uzbek cuisines. Plov also called osh, is the national dish in Tajikistan, as in other countries in the region. Green tea is the national drink.

In 2013 Tajikistan, like many of the other Central Asian countries, was experiencing major development in its transportation sector. As a landlocked country Tajikistan has no ports and the majority of transportation is via roads, air, and rail.

In 1999–2001, Ukraine served as a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council. Historically, Soviet Ukraine joined the United Nations in 1945 as one of the original members following a Western compromise with the Soviet Union, which had asked for seats for all 15 of its union republics. Ukraine also has made a substantial contribution to UN peacekeeping operations since 1992.

System of Education

Despite its poverty, Tajikistan has a high rate of literacy due to the old Soviet system of free education, with an estimated 99.8%[140] of the population having the ability to read and write.

Public education in Tajikistan consists of 11 years of primary and secondary education but the government planned to implement a 12-year system in 2016.[141] There is a relatively large number of tertiary education institutions including Khujand State University which has 76 departments in 15 faculties,[141] Tajikistan State University of Law, Business, & Politics, Khorugh State University, Agricultural University of Tajikistan, Tajik National University, and several other institutions. Most, but not all, universities were established during the Soviet Era. As of 2008 tertiary education enrollment was 17%, significantly below the sub-regional average of 37%, although higher than any other low-income country after Syria.[143] Many Tajiks left the education system due to low demand in the labour market for people with extensive educational training or professional skills.